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EOS Mission
Equal
Opportunity
Schools

Ensuring that low-income and students of color have equitable access to America's most academically intense high school programs and succeed at the highest levels.

NBA Foundation
Equal Opportunity Schools in partnership with Kingmakers of Oakland would like to say
THANK YOU NBA FOUNDATION

For the grant supporting education equity for high schoolers nationwide!

Measures that Matter
Check out Equal Opportunity Schools' latest research,
MEASURING WHAT MATTERS

The Cues and Conditions of Student Belonging.

Eddie New School Year Welcome
Interim CEO Eddie Lincoln
WELCOMES YOU TO A NEW SCHOOL YEAR
Sasha German Blog
Congratulations Interim President &
Chief Strategy Officer
DR. SASHA RABKIN

Featured on Deutsch-Amerikanisches Institut Saarland, a vlog promoting German-American relations through educational and informational work

Sasha Rabkin
Fiveable Partnership
Equal Opportunity Schools
PARTNERS WITH GOOGLE.ORG'S 'RISING STEM SCHOLARS INITIATIVE'

To elevate AP experiences for 2,000+ low-income and students of color in the Bay Area

COVID-19 Research
Tableau Foundation features EOS'
COVID-19 EDUCATION EQUITY RESEARCH

Learn more about how our data tools have helped schools keep equity at the center of their COVID response.

Alison on the Move
Partnership Managing Director
Alison Gazarek featured on
THE ROAD MAP PROJECT BLOG

Sharing her vision for equitable education.

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Eddie Lincoln
Eddie Lincoln
Interim Chief Executive Officer

EOS Interim CEO Announced as Co-Chair of Mayor-elect Bruce Harrell’s Transition Team

Seattle Mayor-elect Bruce Harrell has named Equal Opportunity Schools Interim CEO Eddie Lincoln as one of our four co-chairs that will lead his transition efforts. “Having leadership at the top that accurately reflects our communities is what is needed to ensure all voices are heard, and the best outcomes are reached,” Eddie shares. “It is my honor to help lead and organize this effort.”

Read the full release

 

We collaborate with school districts to increase equitable enrollment in rigorous courses.

Equal Opportunity Schools’ mission is to ensure that students of color and low-income students have equitable access to America’s most academically intense high school programs and succeed at the highest levels.

Our partnership model is consultative, collaborative, and requires a commitment to specific and measurable results. Equal Opportunity Schools (EOS) has helped more than 600 schools identify students of color and low-income students who qualify for, but are missing from Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) classes. Working together, we successfully enroll them and support their academic success.

EOS is headquartered in Seattle, Washington and continues to hire professionals to support our growing portfolio of partner districts.

To learn more, contact us today or email us with questions.  

 

Read more: Rising STEM Scholars Initiative

Student iconThree-quarters of a million high school students are ready to be enrolled.

Each year, approximately three-quarters of a million incoming juniors and seniors are ready to be enrolled in rigorous academic programs, but do not have equitable access to these courses. These students are disproportionately students of color and low-income students. We help schools identify and remove barriers to equitable access.

Graduation iconAccess to AP/IB has a lasting impact.

We know that participation in rigorous courses is correlated with future academic outcomes. Tackling the equity gap will require creating equitable access to these courses.

high school student

That’s why we’re here.

Equal Opportunity Schools has worked with schools coast-to-coast to help tens of thousands of students of color and low-income students enroll in rigorous academic programs.

Let’s close the AP/IB gap together.

“My AP class has prepared me so much for the future. I used to be scared having to grow up and the thought of college work would be so difficult.

I had thought that AP classes were mostly for “smart people”, now I know it isn’t about being smart, it is about putting in the time and effort into the difficult things.” Underrepresented AP Student